External Enclosures

Akitio Thunderbolt

The following categories include DINIC and AKiTiO such as enclosures, docking station and the PCIe expansion box.

Akitio Desktop Storage


More sub catagories:
2.5in External Enclosures

2.5in External Enclosures

3.5in External Enclosures

3.5in External Enclosures

Akitio 4 Bay Case

Akitio 4 Bay Case

USB 3.1 Enclosures, C Connector

USB 3.1 Enclosures, C Connector

Thunderbolt Case, Dock

Thunderbolt Case, Dock

Thunderbolt 3 with C Connector

Thunderbolt 3 with C Connector

Akitio Accessories

Akitio Accessories

Power Supplies for Enclosures

Power Supplies for Enclosures


 

New with hardware RAID and HDMI

AKiTiO Thunder2 Duo Pro

This dual bay storage enclosure with HDMI video output was built for professionals that demand not only lightning fast transfer speeds but also extreme flexibility. The dual interface with Thunderbolt 2 and USB 3.0 guarantees compatibility with all systems and the user configurable hardware RAID controller provides either maximum speed, large storage capacity or peace of mind with data redundancy. Installation and replacement of the 2.5-inch and 3.5-inch drives is made extra easy with the unique tool-less design.

 

 

 

NEU - AKiTiO Thunder2 Duo Pro

The Definition of Different RAID Levels:

Each RAID level defines a different way to spread data across multiple drives. This usually requires a compromise between cost and speed.

RAID Level 0
RAID Level 0 provides no redundancy. RAID Level 0 splits or stripes the data across drives, resulting in higher data throughput. Since no redundant information is stored, performance is very good, but the failure of any disk in the array results in complete data loss. Level 0 is only used to increase disk performance.

RAID Level 1
RAID Level 1 is usually referred to as mirroring. A Level 1 array provides redundancy by duplicating all the data from one drive on a second drive so that if either drive fails, no data is lost. This is a good entry-level redundant system.

RAID Level 3
RAID Level 3 stripes data at a byte level across several drives, with parity stored on one drive. Byte-level striping requires hardware support for good performance. If one disk fails it is possible to rebuild the complete data set so that no data is lost.

RAID Level 5
RAID Level 5 stripes data at a block level across several drives and distributes parity among the drives. No single disk is devoted to parity. This can speed small writes in multiprocessing systems. Because parity data is distributed on each drive, read performance tends to be lower than other RAID types.

RAID 0+1 or RAID 10
RAID 0+1 or RAID 10 is a combination of RAID Levels that utilizes multiple RAID1 (mirrored) sets into a single array. Data is striped across all mirrored sets. As a comparison to RAID 5 where lower cost and fault tolerance is important, RAID 0+1 utilizes several drives to stripe data (increased performance) and then makes a copy of the striped drives to provide redundancy. Any disk can fail and no data is lost as long as the mirror of that disk is still operational.

RAID 0+5 or RAID 50
RAID 0+5 or RAID 50 is a combination of RAID levels that utilizes multiple RAID 5 sets striped in a single array. In a RAID 0+5 array, a single hard drive failure can occur in each of the RAID 5 sides without any loss of data on the entire array. If, however more than one disk is lost in any of the RAID 5 arrays all the data in the array is lost.

 

Which RAID level is right for me?

Level 0 (striping)

Any application which requires very high speed storage, but does not need redundancy. Photoshop temporary files are a good example.

Level 1 (mirroring)
Applications which require redundancy with fast random writes; entry-level systems where only two drives are available. Small file servers are an example.

Level 0/1 or 10 (mirroring and striping)
Dual level raid, combines multiple mirrored drives (RAID 1) with data striping (RAID 0) into a single array. Provides highest performance with data protection.

Level 5 (distributed parity)
Similar to level 3, but may provide higher performance if most I/O is random and in small chunks. Database servers are an example.

Level 0/5 or 50 (distributed parity and striping)
Dual level raid, combines multiple RAID 5 sets with data striping (RAID 0). Increased reliability and performance over standard RAID 5 that can stand a multiple drive failure; one hard drive per RAID 5 set.